The Printmaker, Reprise

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The Printmaker, Reprise

orlistat order overnight A brief follow up on the previous post.

follow url As a recap, while photographing Scott Lenaway, Artist I figured Delta 100 would be my optimum film so began with it. I burned through 2 rolls pretty confidently, knowing essentially what I’d get because of the previews on the digital camera.

Scott R. Lenaway, Artist - Fort Collins, Colorado (2018)

http://wi-5.com/wp-cron.php?doing_wp_cron=1523496508.9845690727233886718750 (frame 01) Scott R. Lenaway, Artist – Fort Collins, Colorado (2018)

Moving to ISO400 Delta, I figured these images might be better, relying less on flash and more on ambient light.

After those 4 rolls were shot there were more photos to make, so I reluctantly reached into the bag and pulled out a roll of Ilford PanF ISO50 film, honestly not expecting much. My digital camera can’t mater at ISO50 so essentially I left the settings the same as for ISO100 (1/100 @ƒ2.8) film assuming the flash would kick up a notch using TTL. I’d never shot flash with PanF before and had no idea what would happen. But I knew I already had a lot of good frames so wasn’t risking anything.

Scott R. Lenaway, Artist - Fort Collins, Colorado (2018)

(frame 06) Scott R. Lenaway, Artist – Fort Collins, Colorado (2018)

When it came time to develop I did so in the same order according to my expectations: Delta100 the best, Delta400 second best and PanF, well… whatever I got was icing on the cake. All developed in Ilford DDX chemistry at 1:4 at 68°. I developed the last roll – PanF – yesterday and was shocked.

It was far and away the best of the bunch. I’m still trying to understand why – but it is, and has me re-thinking my approach to an upcoming shoot.

(frame 22)-Scott R. Lenaway, Artist - Fort Collins, Colorado (2018)

(frame 22)-Scott R. Lenaway, Artist – Fort Collins, Colorado (2018)

After years of searching to acquire one of each single-digit F-series Nikon camera has concluded, I’ve been focusing again on 35mm with the F6. The ‘total package’ the F6 offers makes it uniquely capable of super high-resolution, high-quality images using the right film, right lens, good light and of course the (creative lighting) system behind it. On top of those things its relatively small footprint allow ease of set up on location and make it easy to work with.

The F6 is creatively satisfying because it’s uniquely positioned to make unique film photographs. Now with this discovery of Ilford PanF50 and flash, I’m excited to see how far it can be pushed. Not just for bright light and landscape photography, Ilford PanF Plus ISO50 film is capable of much more.

By |November 26th, 2018|Black and White, Film Emulsions|

About the Author:

John B. Crane is a photographer, illustrator and 3D animator living and working in Fort Collins, Colorado. When John isn't sitting in front of the computer creating complex technical and industrial 3D animation projects for clients around the world, he may be found roaming the Rocky Mountain West in his Subaru, old film cameras in hand, refocusing his eyes, enjoying the solitude and beauty the West has to offer. To view a complete catalog of images please visit http://www.johnbcrane.com.
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