Mirror-Up Shooting: It’s For Real

Mirror-Up Shooting: It’s For Real

go Recently I read a blog post from someone claiming Mirror-Up shooting was a hoax. A waste of time, something camera manufacturers dreamed up as way to add a new feature to the camera and charge more for it. A “Emperor’s New Clothes” hoodwink, if you will. Well, take a look at this:

source It’s slow motion video of the venerable Nikon F2 at 1/2000 sec. and the lens stopped down to ƒ16. If there were ever any doubt in anyone’s mind whether the mirror’s movement has the ability to create vibrations inside the mirror box this should answer the question once and for all.

click here To those who don’t know what Mirror-Up shooting is, please visit this page for a more detailed explanation. Essentially, M-Up is a feature included in certain cameras allowing a 2-step shutter release. The first step raises the Mirror up out of the way. The camera then is allowed to “settle” as long as you want before the second step – releasing the shutter in the camera and actually exposing the film. This all happens so fast in regular shooting that it feels like 1 quick step – but it’s actually 2. M-Up is highly useful in slower-speed photography: between 1/30 sec. and 1-2 seconds. For shutter speeds outside of this range it could be argued that the motions happen so fast there’s not time for the slight movement to affect image quality. But in that dead zone of slow exposures M-Up is real.

About the Author:

John B. Crane is a photographer, illustrator and 3D animator living and working in Fort Collins, Colorado. When John isn't sitting in front of the computer creating complex technical and industrial 3D animation projects for clients around the world, he may be found roaming the Rocky Mountain West in his Subaru, old film cameras in hand, refocusing his eyes, enjoying the solitude and beauty the West has to offer. To view a complete catalog of images please visit http://www.johnbcrane.com.
%d bloggers like this: